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BUILDING SERVIVES ENGINEERING

WE SUPPLY, WE INSTALL

PLUMBING and DRAINAGE

                                     

         Our areas of expertise include SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF:

  • Drain, Soil & Waste piping [uPVC and Cast Iron]
  • Heating and ventilation piping [Use of PEX pipe]
  • Hot and cold water and Gas piping [PEX, PPR, Stainless Steel, and G.I]

Historic FIRSTS:

2018: ALPINE BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING

2010: ALPINE UPVC PIPES AND FITTINGS

1996: PPR Pipes (Rietti) in Pakistan market.

1998; UK UPVC pipes in Pakistan market 

1992: Launched concept of  Grease traps, Oil Traps in Plumbing

1988: Alpine Spun Pipes

1958: KI High Pressure Valves in Oil/Gas sector

 

 

 



Three 03 Designs OF PLUMBING SYSTEMS by using PEX PIPES

1...Trunk-and-branch systems

2...Home-run manifold systems

3...Sub-manifold systems

Description: Article Image

Incorporating manifolds into the layout can save water and energy because you eliminate most of the pipe between the water heater and the faucet. Although blue (cold water) lines are shown in these layout examples, hot-water layout would be similar.

1. Trunk-and-branch systems are easy, but waste a lot of hot water

Traditional systems consist of large-diameter (usually 3/4 in.) trunk lines to distribute water throughout a house. Smaller branch lines (1/2 in. and 3/8 in.) tee off to feed individual fixtures. Trunk-and-branch systems have several disadvantages, notably a large number of fittings, which are costlier, slower to install, and more likely to leak than a single run of pipe. Also, a lot of water goes down the drain before hot water reaches the faucet.

Description: https://s3.amazonaws.com/finehomebuilding.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2009/03/20133742/pex-system-01.jpg

2. Home-run manifold systems use the least hot water and the most pipe

A large-diameter (3/4 in.) main water line feeds the manifold; smaller lines run from the manifold to each fixture. Any fixture in the house can be shut off at the manifold. And because home-run systems don’t rely on a large pipe for distribution, you save both water and energy. Simply put, you don’t have to leave the faucet running as long before hot water reaches the sink. This design flexibility has a cost, however, because a dedicated line is going to each fixture, you use a lot of PEX pipes.

Description: https://s3.amazonaws.com/finehomebuilding.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2009/03/20134207/pex-system-02.jpg

3. Sub-manifold systems can be designed to save hot water

There are many ways to design submanifold systems, which require far less pipe than a home-run system (design# 2). Rather than one main manifold, each bathroom, laundry, and kitchen gets its own submanifold. The simplest system, pictured here, won’t save any water over a trunk-and-branch system, but other submanifold systems can be configured as water and energy savers by incorporating a main manifold and a recirculating pump.

Description: https://s3.amazonaws.com/finehomebuilding.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2009/03/20134329/pex-system-03.jpg

 

Above 03 design excerpts are from https://www.finehomebuilding.com/2009/03/02/three-designs-for-pex-plumbing-systems